Posts Tagged ‘TLC for Kids’

TOYS CAN BE MULTITASKERS, TOO!

If you have been to the toy aisles of your local EverythingMart lately, you know how overwhelming shopping for toys can be.  There are so many choices!  Do you choose based on age?  Gender?  Television show or movie tie-in?  How in the world can you figure out how to best stock your playroom with toys that the kids will actually play with?  It is very disheartening to buy a toy that you’re sure your child will love, only to have them play with it for a day and then shove it in the bottom of the toy box.   In this article I am going to share some tips for getting the most bang for your buck in the toy aisle!

There are many things to consider before bringing a toy into your playroom – especially if you are concerned with creating an atmosphere that is fun, supports your family’s values, and promotes early learning.   The toy industry’s marketing machine is a huge behemoth that will make you feel that if you love your children, you always have to be buying the latest and greatest buzzing, light up, battery-operated monstrosity. Don’t get me wrong- some of those toys can be FUN!  There is certainly a time and place for them.

However, there are a few other things to consider when choosing a toy … read more from Nannypalooza.com

Find the Perfect Holiday Gift For Your Nanny-Family

As a nanny, the family you work for is like your second family. You want to find the perfect gifts for the parents and children you adore, but they may be a bit difficult to please. This holiday season, take into consideration the family members’ personality types, brainstorm thoughtful gifts, identify undeniably helpful, practical items and employ efficient and skillful shopping methods. With the right approach, you are sure to find gifts that will wow. Here are some tips and methods that will help you find the perfect gifts for your nanny-family:

Considering Personality

A gift won’t make an impact unless it is something that relates to the giftee’s personality. You want your gift to reflect the child or parent that you give it to. Have a brainstorming session where you write down each family member’s name and explore the most prominent parts of their personality. Identify traits, hobbies, likes and dislikes so you have a thorough list for each individual. Record your list and brainstormed thoughts on a digital or physical notepad so you can use this as a guide when you shop for gifts. If you struggle to come up with ideas on your own, write down some questions you can ask the children or parents to find out more about them. Make sure you do this in a tactful way, so you don’t come off as too intrusive or give away the fact that you’re searching for the perfect gift.

Read more on finding the perfect gift for your nanny family on Regarding Nannies.

What causes separation anxiety?

Separation anxiety does not have a particular “cause.” It is a perfectly normal and important developmental adaptation of a child’s emotional and mental growth. Nothing you have done has “made” your child develop separation anxiety.

Even though separation anxiety has not been caused by any particular action or event, there are caregiver actions that can either heighten or reduce a child’s normal anxiety. There are many things that can help build a child’s trust and confidence in his relationship with you so that he can transfer these feelings to other trusted adults who will help him feel safe away from his home base.

Nearly all children experience some aspect of separation anxiety. For some children the stage begins earlier, even at a few months of age. For some, the effects begin later, and some children have anxiety that lasts for longer spells than others. Some children have very visible, intense or obvious indicators of their feelings, but there are also children who have less apparent reactions. There is no exact pattern or set of symptoms, but almost all children have it to some degree.

The development of separation anxiety demonstrates that your child has formed a healthy, loving attachment to you. It is a beautiful sign that your child associates pleasure, comfort, and security with your presence.

This stage, like so many others in childhood, will pass. In time, your child will learn that she can separate from you, that you will return, and that everything will be okay between those two points in time. Much of this learning is based on trust and experience, which, just as for every human being young or old, takes time to build.

 

by Elizabeth Pantley, Excerpted with permission by McGraw-Hill Publishing from The No-Cry Separation Anxiety Solution (McGraw-Hill, 2009).

How to Sell Yourself with a Resume full of Short-Term Positions

Our guest post today comes from the International Nanny Association.

No matter what industry you are in, job searching is hard to do. Between researching job duties, meeting minimum requirements, and updating your resume, it seems like getting a job- can be its own full-time job! So when your job history read a little more like “for the time being” than “for the long term”, you may need some help making all those short-lived positions seem like an asset rather than a liability. Here are 5 good ways to persuade a future employer that your short-term positions are of high value:

  1. Acknowledge that you have a resume of short-term positions. Position yourself to professionally answer questions about your job history; being able to explain this over the phone, or in-person, is even better, so be proactive in making connections and seeking face-to-face contact. Whether you quit under good or bad circumstances, or were fired, “let go” or simply not needed anymore, you need to own this part of your individual professional package. Presenting a positive, optimistic attitude can go a long way in showing an agency or potential employer what kind of demeanor you have when going through a difficult situation. Staying honest when questioned about the amount of turnover in your positions, will show trustworthiness and transparency- traits that are highly favored by employers.

Read all 5 Tips from the International Nanny Association

Babysitters for Art Basel

Art Basel is an exciting time of year in Miami.  However, visiting exhibits like Art Miami,  Aqua, and Red Dot can be stressful with young kids.   It’s hard to enjoy all the beautiful art work when you are worried about your kids touching everything!

Parents start to wonder what to do with their kids while they are at Art Basel or enjoying the Miami Nightlife.

TLC for Kids Miami has the answer!   TLC For Kids has vetted, loving and experienced babysitters who can come to your hotel to entertain and safeguard your children so you can tour Art Basal.

It’s easy to reserve a TLC Miami hotel babysitter.   Visit our website to complete the Hotel Reservation form.  A TLC representative will contact you immediately to assign and confirm an experienced sitter.  TLC sitters will make sure your child is having fun while you are away!

Thanksgiving Activities

 

 Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Can you believe Thanksgiving is this week??  It seems like just yesterday we started school.

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite Holidays.  What’s not to love about a Holiday all about giving thanks to all the great things in our lives.  No stress about buying gifts or having the latest toys.  I love being able to spend time with my family and eat delicious foods.  YUM!

Thanksgiving crafts are so cute.  Do you remember tracing your hands to make turkeys?

If you are looking for something besides turkey hands, I found some cute crafts to share with your kids this Thanksgiving.

Looking for more Thanksgiving ideas?  Visit the TLC  Pinterest Board!

 Gobble Gobble!

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency  for over 25 years.   TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more.  Reach us at info@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

 

 

TLC for Kids Receives Industry Award for Innovation

On October 21, 2017 TLC for Kids was honored by the Association of Premier Nanny Agencies with their APNA Honors Award for Innovation in our industry. This award is given to an individual or agency that tries something new which enhances their business, increases revenues and incites change or advancement within the industry as a whole. For over 32 years, TLC has been a leading innovator in the in-home child care industry. 

In 1985, using her thesis in college exploring women in leadership as a starting point, Sharon Graff launched one of the the first back-up child care care services in the US. She used the Kelly Girl model to develop an infrastructure to make emergency and sick care available for working mothers. Within 2 weeks of opening TLC For Kids, at age 22, Sharon appeared on the local CBS Morning news  discussing the “Superwoman Myth” – TLC offered a solution to the child care dilemma. Not only could TLC find a nanny for your family but we could also fill in when your regular care arrangement fell through or when your child was ill. The phone started ringing off the hook.  TLC For Kids became one of the first nanny and babysitting agencies in the country and paved the way for an industry.

The idea of fully screened on-call nannies and babysitters available around the clock was a revolutionary idea that would become common place in nanny agencies as the industry was born and began to mature. From that moment TLC would become a national model for temporary services in our industry. In 1988 Sharon joined the International Nanny Association which had just started uniting nanny agencies, educators, and nannies toward the goal of professionalizing the industry. Recognizing the importance of having the representation of an Industry Association, Sharon and some of her counterparts worked tirelessly to develop the INA into what it is today, a reputable, well-known and trustworthy resource for agencies, nannies, educators and families alike.

In 1987, Sharon’s sister Stephanie joined TLC full time and together with the help of their dynamic staff continued to innovate.  TLC created a state funded training program for in-home child care providers. This program ran for many years and was well attended. In 1994, TLC was one of the first in the in-home child care industry to develop training for nannies who wanted to support postpartum mothers and their infants. TLC shares this program through workshops and materials, and it subsequently became an area of growth for all in the industry who participated in it.  Around this time TLC also developed the first industry-specific software package that was designed to manage the unique needs of our industry including the management of applicants in process, scheduling temporary services, creating professional caregiver profiles, and automating many repetitive but required tasks.

During this time, TLC also began offering consulting services to start-up nanny and child care agencies, and has now has consulted with hundreds of agencies throughout North America.  Sharon was part of the team who presented the New Agency Workshop for over 5 years. Her goal was to raise the bar for quality and promote best practices for those entering the industry in order to ensure a better perception and reputation for the entire industry.

In 1996, Sharon joined the Board of Directors for the International Nanny Association where she would serve for 16 years in many capacities, helping to develop and set those standards and guidelines to develop both the professional practices and perceptions of the home child care industry to the public at large. A large part of her role with the INA was innovation. As chairperson of website committee and public relations committee, Sharon helped bring nannies as a respected profession into the fabric of American culture. At the first APNA conference in 1996, a very pregnant Sharon provided a workshop to the newly formed APNA members and participants about temporary services.

Over the past 32 years Sharon, Angela, Stephanie and the rest of the TLC team shared their business practices and innovative growth with many industry counterparts through workshops at APNA and INA as well as submitting articles in the INA Newsletter.  It is for all of the above reasons that TLC should be recognized as a long-running and persistent innovator in the child-care space, as well as its past and ongoing contributions to the health and reputation of the industry as a whole.

Teach Your Child to Practice Good Dental Hygiene

Children need to be taught the proper way how to care for their teeth as soon as their teeth begin to develop – and if you start them on the habit early, they’ll have good dental hygiene as an adult.dentist

You’ll have to carefully brush a baby’s teeth with a soft brush and don’t use any toothpaste until your child is aware that the toothpaste shouldn’t be swallowed. For most children, that awareness is around the age of two.

By this age, under adult supervision, children should be in the habit of brushing their teeth – and if you make it fun, children will want to brush their teeth. By the time a child reaches kindergarten age, he should be able to brush his teeth without adult supervision.

Children should avoid sugary snacks like lollipops that coat the teeth with sugar for long periods of time – and they should also avoid high sugar beverages that can damage the tooth enamel.

Though it’s a fairly common practice, discourage your child from thumb sucking, which can lead to buck teeth and poor tooth alignment. Teach your child to keep his fingers out of his mouth, since this is one of the main ways that kids pick up germs.

If your child is very young, to help him understand and get into the habit of taking care of his teeth, use a colorful chart to teach about good oral hygiene. You can use a blank calendar that has squares for every day of the week and let him put a check mark in the box every time he brushes his teeth.

Kids should learn about flossing as soon as they’re able to hold the floss and should floss every single day. Regular dental visits should be begin as soon as your child starts to have teeth, because regular visits can catch small problems before they become big problems.

Children should brush at least twice a day using fluoride toothpaste. If your child isn’t old enough yet, and you need to brush for him, brush the outside of the teeth first from the back to the front and then switch to the back of the teeth. Make sure you brush the tongue as well.

Your child’s toothbrush should be changed regularly – every twelve weeks – or sooner, if the bristles are damaged. Also, your child’s toothbrush should be changed after every illness because the bristles can house the germs that caused the infection. Don’t store toothbrushes in covered containers, since this provides a breeding ground for germs.

Caring For Sick Kids

Cold and Flu season is upon us. Make sure you’ve stocked up on all the essentials – cold medicine, thermometer, throat drops, tea, and get your flu shot. Another item to cross off your list should be to contact TLC and be registered for our backup care. Be prepared when the unexpected arrives. A reminder to caregivers, when doing a sick care job for TLC always follow the parent’s guidelines and remember to get permission in writing before giving any medicine. 
Here are a couple of extra tips to keep in mind when caring for sick kids.
1.  Always use a digital thermometer.  The most accurate way to take a temperature for a child over the age of one is with orally with a digital thermometer.
2. Don’t treat kids under the age of 12 with a multi-symptom cold medicine.  The best way to treat a cold is by using a humidifier, a saline solution for the nose, and by giving lots of fluids. With parents permission you can give acetaminophen or ibuprofen for fevers or achiness.
3. Always use the medicine dispenser that came with the medicine.  Teaspoons used in everyday kitchen ware can vary from set to set.
For more tips on treating sick kids you can read the entire article.  It’s interesting to see that some things we may have been taught to do (or that we did as a kid) aren’t recommended anymore.
Remember to wash your hands, get plenty of rest, and drink lots of water so you can stay healthy!

Helping your child adjust to a new caregiver.

Every child will receive care from someone other than their parents.  It may be a nanny, babysitter, grandparent, daycare worker or teacher.  Often times this situation can be difficult for both parent and child. Nanny Resources

TLC Family Care would like to share some tips to help you both through this new challenge.

1. Preparation.  A few days before start talking to your child about what is going to happen.  If possible take a look at the new setting and talk to your little one about what is going to happen during the day.  If you have hired a new nanny have the nanny come over to play first before she starts work.

2. Communication.  Tell the new nanny or caregiver all about your child.  Share routines and likes and dislikes.  You can also tell the nanny about recent events that might help build a relationship.

3. Transition objects.  If possible let your little one keep something with them that will remind them of home.  This can be comforting for your child.  A transition object might be a blankie, favorite stuffed animal or a picture of mom or dad.

4. Play Games.  For a younger child playing games like peek-a-boo and hide-n-seek help with  separation anxiety.  Kids learn that things continue to exist even if they are out of sight.  It also helps teach children the idea of a reunion and that objects and parents do come back.

5. Aftermath.  Finally be prepared that your child may react to the separation after the fact.  This may come in regression in toilet training, temper tantrums, or low levels of frustration.  Remain calm and talk to your child about their feelings and reassure them that everything is going to be OK.  Let the nanny or caregiver know about these new feelings too.

TLC’s nannies have experience working with kids and come ready to help make the transition a smooth one. Give us a call today to speak with one of our placement specialists and help you find the perfect caregiver for your family.

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more.  Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.