Responsibility is always something that comes with a price. Part of the problem with a lot of situations and children today is that they simply don’t have the responsibility that they need to make good decisions and to do well in the world around them. There are many reasons for this, and there are many things that a parent can do in order to help their children learn more responsibility in the long run. 

First of all, the best way to teach a child responsibility is to model it. It is a proven fact that a child will respond best to what he sees around him. This means that as a child watches the way that you run your life and the things that you say and do to others, this is what they are going to learn. Therefore, if you are not responsible, and if you do things that you might not think are the best ways to do things, you will see that your child will model these behaviors as well. There are many times when you might find yourself faced with this type of choice – and you should know that the best way for you to get children to be responsible is to show them what it means to be responsible.

The other way that you can teach your children to be responsible is to start small. Many times when a parent feels that their child is ready for responsibilities, they shove many onto them at once. This creates a situation where a child has absolutely no idea of how to proceed with their responsibilities, and they might feel as if they have been totally overlooked. If you want to make your child responsible and teach them how to be so, you have to start out in ways that they can understand. Start with small projects and small tasks, and then work your way to the larger things. This is the best way that you can help your child be just as responsible as you need them to be. You cannot teach a child to be responsible by giving them so many tasks that they cannot see a way to be successful. Check out our Pinterest board for ideas the whole family can use when being more responsible with chores.

Therefore, you have to start small. Give a child one thing to do, and make sure that they do it. If, for some reason, they do not do what you have asked them to do, there should be a consequence that happens. Doing small projects with small consequences is the best way that you can make sure your children learn how to be responsible.

Remember that part of being responsible is wanting to take control of things and want to be the person who is in charge. Often, a small pet such as a fish or a hamster is a good way to teach a child to be responsible because they are fairly easy to care for and they are something that a parent can deal with if they need to. If your child wants a larger pet like a cat or a dog, you can start small and see how they handle the responsibility of that smaller pet. If they are able to take care of the smaller pet, you might find that they are ready for bigger responsibilities. Remember, a child will be more likely to show you what they are ready for, and they will be more likely to help you understand what they can and cannot do yet. So take your cues from them, know your children, and you will see that this is the best way for them to become responsible.

Finally, be sure and check out our Pinterest board for ideas the whole family can use when being more responsible with chores.

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

“It’s time to do homework.” 😱

This simple phrase is often dreaded by kids and parents. And it’s understandable.

With so many changes this year, including much more learning from home, parents want to stay involved in their children’s education more than ever. But spending too much time on homework only seems to lead to distraction, frustration or exhaustion (or all of the above).

It might feel like a constant battle, and homework stress can lead to burnout and anxiety for kids if you’re not careful.

That’s why brain breaks for kids are so important for reducing stress and keeping kids motivated to learn!

 

Read the entire article at ProdigyGame.com

Check out TLC Family Care Pinterest board for more ideas to get the whole family moving.

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

“When we teach mindfulness to kids, we equip them with tools to build self-esteem, manage stress, and skillfully approach challenges. Explore our guide on how to introduce mindfulness and meditation to your children—at any age.”

By teaching children meditation and mindfulness skills we help them increase their well-being and enable them to meet the stresses of the world with presence, self-compassion, and openness.

In order to help kids of all ages find their way into practicing mindfulness, it can be helpful to give them an easy definition they can relate to.

A Definition of Mindfulness Meditation for Children

Mindfulness meditation, at its simplest, is paying attention to what is happening in the present moment. It may be what you’re feeling, hearing, or anything else you notice. There’s no special place of calm you have to reach and it’s not about clearing your mind, it’s just an honest and kind look at what you’re experiencing in this moment.

 

Read the entire article on Mindful.org.  Check out our Pinterest board for more Mindfulness for Kids suggestions.

Even if you’re not a parent, it’s sometimes very difficult to put things into perspective. Life is filled with unexpected twists and turns, many of which are quite frightening.

When you’re a parent, these unexpected roadblocks typically seem all the more daunting. After all, it’s your job to protect your children and assist them in making the best decisions, now and in the future. The following tips are suggestions to help you put things in perspective, as quickly and seamlessly as possible. Honestly, it can be done! All it takes is a little bit of practice.

Image by rawpixel.com

Technically, putting something into perspective is comparing it to a similar situation. The end result is a clear, more accurate understanding of the problem. It can also mean coming to the realization that you now understand the importance of something.

Stay Calm

One of the most crucial things when trying to put things into perspective, is to remain calm… or at least as calm as possible. Take three or four deep breaths. Briefly, close your eyes and try to envision yourself relaxing on the beach or one of your favorite destinations. Listen to music, pull up an app such as Calm or Insight Timer or Headspace. Find an outlet that works for you in the moment.

Doing your best to stay calm allows you to take control of the situation and come to a resolution as soon as possible.

Consider the Feelings of Others

In a perfect world, everyone would be considerate of the feelings of others. When perspective is an issue, try to put yourself in the shoes of all of the other people involved. What are their motives? What do they fear? Why are they behaving this way? These are just a few questions to think about.

Everyone is different. No two people look at a situation exactly the same. Before you say anything that may end up hurting someone’s feelings, step into their shoes. It really makes a difference.

Take a Break

If all else fails, take a break. Put younger kids down for a short nap or if you have older kids who don’t need constant supervision, take a walk around the block. This gives everyone the chance to cool off and think about things in a rational manner.

At this point, you can even talk to yourself a bit (if only in your mind). Doing so might prevent you from overreacting. Overreacting only upsets everyone and elevates the problem.

Remember that you’re the adult. If the situation is causing your children to be upset, seeing you upset will only make things worse. Let’s face it, life is stressful for everyone at times. No one is immune to stress-free parenting.

Now that we’ve talked a bit more about the best ways to put things into perspective, hopefully it’s helped you stay on the right track. Of course, at times, you’ll still feel a challenge. There’s no way around it. But, the more you make use of these tips, the better off you’ll eventually be. Just take it one day at a time and as the saying goes… “don’t sweat the small stuff!” You’re certainly not alone. And, in reality, the world would be a boring place if everybody had the same perspective, wouldn’t it?

Check out our Pinterest board for suggestions on Mindfulness for Adults.

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

As families are going into month seven of working from home and introducing virtual learning, many are struggling with finding the balance between work, family, home and school.

The good news is that many families have found a way to keep up with both the demands of work as well as their loved ones. Families make it work by applying one or more of the following principles to their life: 

The Art of Setting Limits and Saying “No”: Accepting the fact that you cannot do everything is not a sin, and the word “no” is not a dirty word. Although you want to give it your all for your work and your family you have the right to say “no” once in awhile when you need to.

For instance, you may be in a situation where your boss gives you the option whether or not to work on Sundays. If it is not a job requirement, you have no need about feeling guilty if you tell your boss you need that day to yourself.

Likewise, you have the right to not give in to every single demand that your child or teen may have. You will need to teach them that they cannot have every thing in life that they want.

If it means the difference between sanity and keeping your child happy all the time it may be necessary to tell your child he or she will have to wait for that new toy, new computer, etc. In doing so you will also help your child be content with what he or she has right now.

Furthermore, you will help your child by saying “no” to some of the things they want that they do not need. You can explain to them that family time and love between people is more than just material possessions.

Effective Time Management: Families function best when they know how to make time for all the things that are important. This is done most simply with the use of a daily, weekly, or monthly calendar.

Although you may not be able to make every family or work function, you can physically set time aside for the events that are most important. Keeping a calendar and/or task list will take your family a long way.

Task Delegation: One aspect affecting a busy family is finding time for chores as well as work responsibilities and fun time.

The older your children are the more they can share in the household duties. Besides, if the work is divided among the entire family chances are it will free up more time for you to plan for recreation.

Understanding: The most loving families will understand that you cannot always be there for them.

However, at the same time you realize the importance of your family. A truly loving and understanding has mastered the art of helping each other feel loved even during times of absence.

No family is perfect. It may take awhile to help you as a whole to “get it right.” However, the more quality time you can spend together as a family the stronger you will be.

Also, parents need to remember to spend time alone together. Moms and dads need to still go on dates with one another, as hard as it is sometimes to do especially if the children are still young. In the age of COVID, date nights look a lot different, but it can be unplugging and watching a movie together after the kids go to bed. It can be a walk along the neighborhood, or a take-out and a picnic in the back yard.

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

Working from home and virtual learning from home, at the same can be challenging. There are many ways to work from home and learn, so here are a few tips and tricks:

  1. Be Flexible. When possible, organize your work around your family’s needs and your child’s needs. Consider child care during this time. TLC can help support these needs with a full-time, part-time or private educator, based on your schedule. Save high-priority tasks for times when you know you won’t have distractions, and lesser priority for times your child may need assistance. Divide and Conquer with your spouse or significant other so that neither of you burn out managing the same task / role each time.
  2. Define your virtual learning and work-from-home style. Is it comfortable with pjs allowed or do you prefer to get up and dress for the day? Do all tasks need to be checked off or do you go with the flow? Making sure everyone is on the same page will help everyone adjust and meet expectations for the days and weeks ahead.
  3. Expect the Unexpected. Door bells will ring, meetings interrupted, technology won’t cooperate. The washing machine will break, you’ll miss a deadline, and you’ll forget to start dinner. Take a breath. It’s okay. Know that others are going through the same thing you are. This too shall pass. Kids take their cues from those around them. Don’t stress. Manage and move forward.
  4. Be present. Take frequent breaks, even if it’s 5 minutes to step outside, breath the fresh air and center yourself. The same for the kids. No one expects them to sit for hours doing their school work. Encourage outside play, reading, zero technology times. Many school lessons can be done outdoors – take your book outside. Make dinner as a family and it becomes a science lesson. Take a nature walk and it becomes biology.
  5. Communicate. Create an open line of communication with all parties involved. Have weekly family meetings. Discuss what’s coming up and what worked or didn’t work the previous week. Keep a master calendar with important dates, deadlines and notices for everyone to see and refer to as needed.
  6. Encourage independence. Children are capable of so many things. Need a snack?  They don’t need to interrupt you during a meeting. Set an area in the kitchen or pantry with acceptable snack items and let them help themselves. Encourage them to set alarms or timers for projects and free time. Keep books, activities, etc., handy for those times they finish their work and do independent play or activities while you wrap up your work.
  7. Ask for help. Reach out to TLC for child care needs or assistance with private educators, e-learning aides or tutors. Develop relationships with neighbors or school friends that practice the same COVID protocols you and your family do, and offer to support each other when assistance may be needed. Find a virtual support network you can chat with others and share concerns and feedback. We’re all in this together.
  8. Self-Care. Don’t forget to take care of yourself. Give yourself and your children a break. Take a day off and be a family – no work, no school work, no technology. Make sure you’re getting enough rest, are eating healthy and getting outside for walks, bike ride, etc.

As everyone is finding their way juggling work, family and virtual learning, we’re all facing doubts and stressors. We will get through this together.

 

To assist with the current crisis, TLC is temporarily offering FREE MEMBERSHIP and DISCOUNTED AGENCY FEES to all Medical Professionals and First Responders. We know you cannot work at home and want to help you ensure you have solid care arrangements for your loved ones. Call TLC at 314.725.5660 to learn more and get started.

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

For many, the new school year is looking a lot different than what they expected. Virtual learning has become the new norm in many communities and households. Families are converting dining rooms into classrooms, and parents are learning new tech such as Zoom, Google Drive, Online Classrooms and much, much more. Kids are disappointed they won’t be joining their friends in the classroom and on the playground. Meanwhile, you’re working from home and struggling to manage your work and navigate through your child’s virtual learning needs.

As we all adjust and maneuver our way through these new systems, there are ways you can support your child in the days ahead. 

  1. Get Organized. Create a system of calendar, color coding, even post-it notes. Many say writing things down helps them remember. Write assignments down on a calendar – when they are due, deadlines, etc. Keep it where everyone can see it.
  2. Develop a System. Create a system where assignments come in and planned out, homework is turned in, logging in to the classroom, etc. Know that technical challenges will arise and not get upset when they do. We’re all struggling. Each of you take a breath, step away and come back and figure it out together. Determine how to avoid in the future, what could you have done differently?
  3. Make the Workspace Functional yet Comfortable. Don’t have other projects or your own work invade your child’s workspace. If you have multiple children, make sure each has their own designated space. Let them decorate or have one or two special items in view that provide comfort such as a favorite figurine, small stuffed animal, even a motivational framed quote or sticker. Don’t have their workspace next to a high-traffic area of the house, such as the laundry room or front door. Frequent interruptions will definitely impact their learning. Check out our Pinterest board for some inspiration!
  4. Create a schedule that works for all. While you’ll probably have set days and times for the classroom aspect of school with their teacher, make sure your child is getting plenty of time to get up and move around, do supplemental learning such as virtual field trips or arts and crafts.  Know that some days you may go off schedule. Take your cues from your child, and allow some flexibility during the challenging days. Maybe you both take a lunch break at the same time and make it part of your new daily routine.
  5. Support each other. Provide encouragement when they do something well. Motivate each other to finish that assignment you’ve both been putting off until the last minute. While they are doing virtual learning, you’re probably working from home. Find time to celebrate each of your accomplishments.

Finally, if you’re finding you still need support, reach out to TLC. We can assist in finding you support for at-home learning or a private educator to work one-on-one with your child.

 

To assist with the current crisis, TLC is temporarily offering FREE MEMBERSHIP and DISCOUNTED AGENCY FEES to all Medical Professionals and First Responders. We know you cannot work at home and want to help you ensure you have solid care arrangements for your loved ones. Call TLC at 314.725.5660 to learn more and get started.

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

Whether you’re preparing for kids to go back to school or you’re taking them out in public, wearing a mask is recommended for everyone – even children. But getting them to keep them on while out or all-day in a classroom can be challenging and scary. 

The CDC recommendations are as follows:

COVID-19 can be spread to others even if you do not feel sick. A cloth face covering helps prevent a person who is sick from spreading the virus to others. Appropriate and consistent use of cloth face coverings is most important when students, teachers, and staff are indoors and when social distancing of at least 6 feet is difficult to implement or maintain.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on:

  • Children younger than 2 years old.
  • Anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious.
  • Anyone who is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the cloth face covering without assistance.

Appropriate and consistent use of cloth face coverings may be challenging for some students, teachers, and staff, including:

  • Younger students, such as those in early elementary school.
  • Students, teachers, and staff with severe asthma or other breathing difficulties.
  • Students, teachers, and staff with special educational or healthcare needs, including intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental health conditions, and sensory concerns or tactile sensitivity.

Additional information from KidsHealth provides info on WHY kids are afraid of masks, and offers tips to helping kids get used to wearing masks.

Finally, check out our Pinterest board for mask tips and some of our favorites for kids.

 

To assist with the current crisis, TLC is temporarily offering FREE MEMBERSHIP and DISCOUNTED AGENCY FEES to all Medical Professionals and First Responders. We know you cannot work at home and want to help you ensure you have solid care arrangements for your loved ones. Call TLC at 314.725.5660 to learn more and get started.

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

Looking for in-home tutors?

If you are concerned about your child’s grades or feel like a little extra help will be beneficial give us a call.  TLC Family Care has experienced tutors.  Our tutors, like our sitters, have gone through our thorough screening. TLC tutors will come to you virtually, and provide one-on-one instructional help. 

e-learning Aides for Elementary and Middle School students

Our e-Learning Aides (ELA) at TLC offer homework help, project support, and scheduling assistance to help elementary and middle school children succeed with their homeschool workload. Your ELA will help your student by teaching them organizational skills, implementing routines, building structure, and boosting productivity so that tasks are completed, and assignments are turned in on time.There is an hour minimum, but time does not need to be consecutive- that is up to you! It typically takes 1-2 sessions of working together to get a rhythm. Please give your ELA guidance, insight, and any suggestions you have about your child’s learning style in to find the best way to keep them engaged.

Tutor Services for advanced Middle School Courses and High School Students

For students that require more targeted guidance in algebra, geometry, science, and more TLC is honored to have partnered with a superior tutoring organization, Varsity Tutors. Utilizing highly skilled tutors and the latest technology, Varsity Tutors can provide their services in person or via a cellphone app or desktop program. Their leading-edge technology and knowledgeable tutors combine to bring your student the help they need, when and where they need it.

Get started now by contacting them at (855) 454-1072.

 

To assist with the current crisis, TLC is temporarily offering FREE MEMBERSHIP and DISCOUNTED AGENCY FEES to all Medical Professionals and First Responders. We know you cannot work at home and want to help you ensure you have solid care arrangements for your loved ones. Call TLC at 314.725.5660 to learn more and get started.

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Louis, Tampa and more!. Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

During the summer months, many kids go to baseball, basketball, volleyball, swimming and dance camp. We instill values of practice makes perfect, but what about their academics? Luckily, there are lots of tips and tricks to make learning as fun as attending a summer camp with their friends.

 Strengthening math skills:

• Let your children help in the kitchen. Allowing your children to join you in the cooking process teaches them how to read the recipe and measure the ingredients. Recipes also expose your children to fractions, which kids typically have problems understanding.

• Play board games and have your child be the scorekeeper. Games like Yahtzee and Monopoly are good games to help strengthen your child’s math skills because each includes lots of adding, and Monopoly gives your child the chance to learn more about money.

• Grab a stopwatch or a stopwatch app. Children love to play with stopwatches, and giving them one opens up lots of learning opportunities. One way they can use the stopwatch is by timing how long it takes their bike to ride down the street or around the block. Then they can keep track of how fast they go and chart the difference in their time the more they practice. This strengthens number recognition, telling time, and subtraction skills.

 Strengthening reading skills:

• Visit your local library. St. Louis City and County Libraries offer  reading incentive programs for kids of all ages. If getting your child to read has previously been a struggle, this is a good way to get them excited about reading because their friends will be reaping the benefits of the program (like free Cardinal tickets).

• Write letters. Do you have a grandparent, cousin, or friend that lives out of town? Have your children write letters to them. This activity will not only teach your kids how to maintain relationships, but also strengthen their reading and written communication skills.

TLC for Kids also offers tutoring. All of TLC’s tutors have degrees in education. To book a TLC tutor today, call (314) 725-5660.