“Not paying your nanny taxes may seem like an easy way to save some money and not have to deal with the hassles of calculating and remitting taxes. Plus, if you don’t pay nanny taxes, how is anyone going to find out? Your nanny is on board as she gets a few extra dollars in her paycheck. You’re not running for political office or being nominated for a position in government. And those are only the people who get caught not paying nanny taxes, right?

Wrong.

There are a number of ways to easily get caught if you don’t pay nanny taxes. Most will end up with you paying much more in fines and penalties than in the actual tax responsibility you chose to ignore.”

Our friends at GTM Payroll Services have laid it all our for you, and what can happen if you avoid Nanny Taxes.

Every January, we’re asked by both nannies and parents on how to file taxes as an employee / employer.  A nanny is considered a household employee and should receive a W-2. Many times both nannies and parents find this process confusing. There are some wonderful services out there to help both parties navigate the complicated world of nanny taxes.

Still unsure what you need to do? Our friends at HomeWork Solutions have a wonderful library of resources with all the answers.

Paying Your Nanny Legally is the Right Thing to Do 

Why You Can’t Give Your Nanny a 1099

What to do when you don’t get a W-2

Summer is almost here!  If you are taking a vacation with your nanny you should know how to handle her payroll.  If you are looking for a summer nanny to travel with you TLC For Kids can help.

Thank you to Breedlove and Associates for explaining the labor laws for travel to us!

THE LAW

When accompanying an employer on a trip – whether a vacation or a business trip – an employee must be compensated for all hours worked during the trip, including the time spent traveling to the destination. If the employee’s working time exceeds 40 hours in a 7-day period, the employer must pay the employee for the overtime hours at the time-and-a-half rate. In addition to the regular and overtime pay, the employer is responsible for the employee’s traveling expenses, including airfare and hotel accommodations. These expenses are covered by the employer because the employee would not have incurred these expenses on her own.

A traveling employee does not need to be compensated during her “free time,” which is defined as time when she is not responsible for her charges and she has complete freedom to go and do whatever she pleases.