Helping caregivers find rewarding careers as a nanny is such a fulfilling job. I love being able to match nannies and Saint Louis families looking for childcare. Today I received this email from a nanny.  It brought a smile to my face on this cold morning!

“I am enjoying Rory and his family. He is almost 15 months already and starting to walk!  In a couple weeks, he will probably be running!”

“Also, TLC has always been good to me and I would not go through any other nanny agency. Thanks for always being there to answer questions for me and to help me!”

We have lots of great jobs for nannies.  Check out our job board for all the available positions, and then click to apply for nanny jobs.

 

TLC Nanny AgencyI recently came across an article about the importance of free play for kids. The article stressed the importance of play for kids and how it links to their educational, social and physical development.

It’s clear that playing helps a child’s physical development. Gross motor skills are strengthened when kids have time to play and run around. But, did you know that play time can also improve a child’s communication and literacy skills? Play time on a playground with other kids or with a nanny teaches a child how to communicate and share. Play time also teaches kids how to interact with other people and read social cues. Woodbury School is showing kids how to turn imaginative play into plot lines. The schools teachers write down the ‘stories’ the kids are telling. The teachers read the stories back to the kids and then they learn to read them to each other.

The article goes on to say that young kids today have less and less time to play freely because of the emphasis on academics and structure in daycares and preschools. Hiring a nanny to take care of kids in a home instead of a structured daycare can give children more time to play freely. Nanny’s are able to give children one-on-one play time that can grow a child’s imagination.

To read the article in it’s entirety click here.

To learn more about hiring a nanny for your family visit the TLC for Kids Website.

Even with all the rewards and happiness that parenthood provides, it may often leave an introverted parent feeling drained and in desperate need of some time to be alone. This is especially true if you’re an introverted parent trying to raise an extroverted child, who has a need for social interaction that far exceeds your own. Here are some tips for raising an extroverted child when you’re an introverted parent.

Devote Time to Recharge

To provide the best care and environment for your extrovert, you need to devote time to unwind and recharge yourself. For many introverts, prolonged periods of social interaction can be daunting and often leads to feeling anxious or stressed out.

If you’re in a bad mood, there’s a good chance that your child will pick up on that. This can lead to your child feeling depressed. They may blame themselves as a result for something that couldn’t possibly be their fault. Schedule an hour out of the day for a break, to process and manage your stress. Explain to your child why it is important for people to recharge their batteries and turn it into a positive experience for them. This will also give your child the opportunity to process their feelings and experiences.

Provide Opportunities for Interaction

It’s important to provide many opportunities for social interaction for your extroverted child. However, that doesn’t mean you have to turn your home into a hangout spot for all their friends. Schedule social interactions for your child with a wide variety of people. Spend time with family members, schedule play dates with friends from school or take a trip to a public play place where your child can meet new friends.

By establishing interactions outside of the household, you can provide an appropriate level of social interaction for your extrovert while also keeping your personal space. It is recommended, however, that you allow your child to enjoy interactions with their friends in your household on occasion. Even if it’s just once or twice a week, your child will greatly benefit by having a social outlet on a more personal scale.

School Environment for Your Extrovert

Make sure your child is getting an education that properly caters to their extroverted needs. Meet with the school’s staff of teachers and assess what type of classes would be best for your extrovert. Seek out teachers that have a significant amount of practical “field work” in their lesson plans.

The best thing you can do for your child is to get them involved in extracurricular activities, preferably involving groups of people or clubs. This is something that they’ll already be interested in getting involved with. It is a wonderful way for them to socialize and build relationships with like-minded people, as well as learn valuable skills. Discuss what activities your child is interested in – whether it be sports, the chess team or the drama club, and get them involved in as many as you and they can comfortably manage.

As an introverted parent, an extroverted child can sometimes seem like quite a handful. But, even if you aren’t excited about expressing your feelings or meeting new people, it’s important that your kid gets the chance to do so. Every chance that you give them to interact with people will help them to develop their social skills and maybe even earn them a new friend.

 

TLC for Kids is currently placing summer nannies in St. Louis, Atlanta, and South Florida. If you need reliable, energetic, and professional child care visit our website at tlcforkids.com Or, email us at tlc@tlcforkids.com.

Easter is right around the corner. We found these quick, easy and entertaining activities you can do with the kids, guaranteed fun for all.  

Easter Bunny Bread – now who wouldn’t want to sit down to a wonderful meal and enjoy bunny shaped bread, made by the kids!

Marshmallow Peeps Cupcakes – Are you a fan of Peeps? These cupcakes will be a crowd pleaser.

Check out our Pinterest Board full of Easter ideas!

And there’s still time to make that Easter Basket! Our favorite …. you can never go wrong with books and candy!

“Not paying your nanny taxes may seem like an easy way to save some money and not have to deal with the hassles of calculating and remitting taxes. Plus, if you don’t pay nanny taxes, how is anyone going to find out? Your nanny is on board as she gets a few extra dollars in her paycheck. You’re not running for political office or being nominated for a position in government. And those are only the people who get caught not paying nanny taxes, right?

Wrong.

There are a number of ways to easily get caught if you don’t pay nanny taxes. Most will end up with you paying much more in fines and penalties than in the actual tax responsibility you chose to ignore.”

Our friends at GTM Payroll Services have laid it all our for you, and what can happen if you avoid Nanny Taxes.

Our guest post today comes from the International Nanny Association.

No matter what industry you are in, job searching is hard to do. Between researching job duties, meeting minimum requirements, and updating your resume, it seems like getting a job- can be its own full-time job! So when your job history read a little more like “for the time being” than “for the long term”, you may need some help making all those short-lived positions seem like an asset rather than a liability. Here are 5 good ways to persuade a future employer that your short-term positions are of high value:

  1. Acknowledge that you have a resume of short-term positions. Position yourself to professionally answer questions about your job history; being able to explain this over the phone, or in-person, is even better, so be proactive in making connections and seeking face-to-face contact. Whether you quit under good or bad circumstances, or were fired, “let go” or simply not needed anymore, you need to own this part of your individual professional package. Presenting a positive, optimistic attitude can go a long way in showing an agency or potential employer what kind of demeanor you have when going through a difficult situation. Staying honest when questioned about the amount of turnover in your positions, will show trustworthiness and transparency- traits that are highly favored by employers.

Read all 5 Tips from the International Nanny Association

Each year the International Nanny Association honors an outstanding nanny for recognition by his/her peers and in-home child care industry. At the 32nd Annual INA Conference in Chicago, the

Candida Vajana

2017 Nanny of the Year Candida (Candi) Vajana received this honor.

Candi has been a nanny for over 20 years. One of her goals is to elevate the Nanny Profession by showing examples of quality care and by being a role model to empower other nannies. She enjoys being able to instill the basic but important skills of compassion, empathy and knowing that in order to be happy one needs to be able to help others. In her current position she works with one child and travels extensively. Candi enjoys working with families from different cultures around the world and finds that everyone has something to teach you. She believes that nannies have a very important role to play in society, shaping the minds and souls of the leaders of the future.

Do you know an exceptional nanny who should be nominated for INA Nanny of the Year? Take a look at the NOTY Guidelines and consider nominating an outstanding nanny for the 2018 INA Nanny of the Year Award.

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more.  Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660

Our guest post today comes from HomeWork Solutions.

Most nannies and their employers have a very informal work relationship, without any formal written agreement. The work and pay related details that most employers take for granted – Paid Time Off (sick/vacation/personal) and vacation scheduling – are gray clouds over the nanny’s head. Many wonder, and are afraid to ask, will I be paid?

Most nanny employers have established rules in their workplace – paid holidays, a paid vacation policy, and colleagues to share the work load when one is absent. Nannies often have none of these things formalized.

As a rule of thumb, the full time nanny should be paid for any regularly scheduled day when she is available to work and the family, for any reason, decides they don’t need her. This includes holidays such as the 4th of July as well as the family’s beach week. The full time nanny should have an agreed number of Paid Time Off (PTO) or flex days available to her and reasonable latitude to schedule her personal vacation, etc. She may have some scheduling limitations, agreed to in advance, as to the timing and duration of vacation time, but should have reasonable discretion in the matter.

Continue reading for information on part-time and summer nannies.

Today’s guest post comes from Be The Best Nanny Newsletter 

Kids Don’t Naturally Know How to Delay Gratification

When I first started working as a nanny I found a lot of great ideas to use with my nanny kids from author Sheila Ellison.  I will share her clever ideas on how to teach children to be patient today.

The only way to teach children difficult coping, life skills is to practice using those skills as play or activities to do together. But, teaching kids who crave immediate gratification to be patient can be particularly tricky.

In her book 365 Ways to Raise Great Kids Ellison explains that a child that is patient can entertain herself while waiting and listen until she learns and understands.

She writes, “A child who learns patience has found a tool that will help greatly in overcoming the frustrations of life.”

Here are 5 ways Ellison recommends to teach kids to be patient …

To Grandmother’s house we go! And you’ll be in the car for five whole hours! How can you make the trip enjoyable with a baby along? 

Learn about it

There’s no question: Marathon car trips with a baby on board take a good amount of planning and organization. But it can be done ~ and yes, it can even be fun!

Planning the trip

In the hustle that precedes a trip, it can be easy to let things happen, instead of make things happen. Be proactive in making your trip decisions. Contemplating these questions, and coming up with the right answers, can help make your trip more successful:

Does your baby sleep well in the car? If yes, plan your travel time to coincide with a nap or bedtime so your baby can sleep through part of the journey. If not, plan to leave immediately after a nap or upon waking in the morning. Don’t fool yourself into thinking your baby will behave differently than usual in the car just because it’s a special occasion.

  • Is it necessary to make the trip all at once, or can you break it up with stops along the way? The longer your baby is strapped in the carseat, the more likely he’ll become fussy. Planning a few breaks can keep everyone in a better frame of mind.
  • When estimating an arrival time, have you factored in plenty of extra time for unplanned surprises? A diaper explosion that requires a complete change of clothes or a baby whose inconsolable crying requires an unexpected 20-minute stop are just two of the things that can easily happen.
Do you have everything you need to make the trip pleasant? Items like:
  • Window shades to protect your baby from the sun and create a darker, nap-inducing atmosphere.
  • A cooler for cold drinks; a bottle warmer if needed.
  • Plenty of toys that are new or forgotten favorites saved just for the trip.
  • Baby-friendly music on tape or CD.
  • A rear-view baby mirror to keep on eye on baby (unless a second person will be sitting with your little one)
  • Books to read to your baby.

Read more tips from Elizabeth Pantley on how to make the road trip more enjoyable with baby!