Posts Tagged ‘finding babysitters in St. Louis’

Childhood Sleep Issues

From the time a baby is born until he is about six months old, he requires more sleep than an adult — a lot more. Newborns may sleep between 12 and 18 hours out of every 24-hour period. After a child is about six months old, his sleep requirements are a bit higher, but very similar to an adult’s sleep requirements.  

It is of the utmost importance that parents help the child to establish a regular sleep/wake schedule as early as possible. This will make life easier for everybody in the household, including the baby. Babies, even as young as six months old, like continuity.

A regular “go-to-bed” time and a regular “get-up” time as well as a regular “naptime” will help to prevent all kinds of sleep-related problems.

There are lots of reasons why children can have sleep problems. Some of the problems are caused by physical discomfort or illness. Some sleep problems are caused by emotional or developmental problems that might seem totally unrelated to sleep. If your child is consistently unable to sleep (and consistently is the operative word here) it is best to talk to your pediatrician about the problem and have him or her help you resolve the issue.

The thing to remember is that when humans are tired, no matter how old or young they are, they sleep if they aren’t having mental, physical, or emotional pain. Sleep is natural; it isn’t a behavior that must be learned.

If you have worked to establish a regular schedule for your child (eliminated all of the foods and drinks that might prevent sleep, read him a story and tucked him in), and sleep continues to be a problem, it really is time to seek professional help. The lack of normal sleep is a symptom, not a disease.

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more.  Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

 

The Terrific Threes and the Frustrating Fours

Three- and four-year-olds are fascinating. They are, for lack of a better word, “becoming.” They are beginning to show their own unique personality. They are beginning to develop their sense of “self.”

Three- and four-year-olds begin to distinguish between fact and fiction, between what is “real” and what is make-believe. They begin to sort through, distinguish between, and categorize feelings, thoughts, and actions.

There is no specific timetable for development and development is not a “one-size-fits-all” situation. Children develop in different areas at different rates. Development is divided into five general categories: physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and moral. It is perfectly normal for children to make greater advancements in one area at a time.

Physical milestones:

* He’ll be able to ride a tricycle.
* He’ll be able to climb a ladder.
* He can scribble with a pen, pencil, or crayola.
* He begins to dress himself.
* He can feed himself with either a spoon or a fork.
* He is mostly toilet trained.

Intellectual milestones:

* His imagination develops and he likes to assume “play-like” grown-up roles as mommy, daddy, fireman or superhero.
* He is curious and asks a lot of questions.
* He begins to understand the cause/effect concept.

Social milestones:

* He can now accept separation from his mother calmly.
* He beings to interact with other children his own age.
* He begins to notice and imitate the differences in the way men and women behave.

Emotional milestones:

* He is becoming sensitive to the feelings of others.
* He is becoming more independent.
* He wants to please the adults in his world.

Moral milestones:

* He begins to understand the difference between right and wrong.
* He wants people to like him.
* He is gaining self-control.

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more.  Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

The Terrible Twos and the Terrific Threes

There’s a very good reason why we often refer to two-year-olds as the “terrible twos.” They are discovering themselves. They discover that it is possible for them to make their own choices about food, clothes, sleep, and play. The two-year-old is aware of becoming a separate and distinct human being.    

The good news is that the terrible twos only last for about a year, and even better news is that they are followed by the terrific threes.

Indications to parents that there could be a problem in normal development are if the child becomes either too easily adaptable or too aggressive. Both extremes indicate problems and should be discussed with the child’s pediatrician.

There are five general areas of development: physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and moral. There is, of course, no specified or RIGHT order in which children develop. Remember that each child is an individual, and the following is only a general outline of the development expected of two- and three-year-olds.

Physical development:

* Coordination improves and physical activities include: running, climbing, kicking and throwing a ball, pulling and pushing objects, etc.
* He handles and manipulates small objects like buttons, zippers, pencils, etc.
* He feeds himself with a spoon.
* He helps to dress himself.
* He can build a block tower of six or seven blocks.
* Will gain control of bowels and bladder.

Intellectual development:

* He is very curious and explores the world using all five senses.
* He can make sentences of three or four words.
* He can sing simple songs.
* He can keep simple rhythms.

Social development:

* He is still wary of strangers and clings to his mother.
* Attempts to imitate adult activities like washing dishes, mopping floors, applying makeup, shaving, etc.
* He can participate in simple group activities like listening to a short story.

Emotional development:

* Begins to assert himself and says “no” frequently.
* Shows emotions by laughing, squealing, throwing temper tantrums and crying hysterically.
* Develops fear of such things as animals and loud noises.

Moral development:

* He wants to “be good.”
* He still can’t keep promises.

Teaching Good Manners

Good manners makes other people like a child, but maybe it’s more important that good manners make a child like himself and give him confidence. Nobody wants to embarrass themselves by committing a faux pas. So the question is, how does a parent go about teaching a child good manners?  

Actually, teaching good manners begins early and almost naturally. We teach our little ones to use the “magic words” (“please” and “thank you”) as soon as they master “mama and dada.”

Young children imitate what they see the adults in their world do. Imitation is the way children learn. If they see their parents using basic good manners, they will use good basic manners themselves.

But the finer points of good manners must be instructed. When instructing a child in using good manners, it is important to use positive teaching techniques rather than negative reprimands.

Good manners sometimes are governed by the words we choose to express thoughts. Your little darling might say, “YUCK! I hate this slimy green stuff!” Wait to correct him and at a later time and in private you tell the child that it would be more polite to say, “I really don’t care for spinach.”

It takes time and patience to teach a child to have good manners. You aren’t going to cover the spectrum of good manners in a day of instruction, no matter how intense. Teaching good manners goes on and on. As situations are presented, you teach the child the most polite way to handle them.

And when you know that your child knows how to use good manners, you need to expect him to use those good manners all the time. Good manners can become a good habit and help your child to become confident in himself in social situations.

The Wonderful Ones and the Terrible Twos

Children who are between the ages of one year and three years are referred to as a group as “toddlers,” but there is a great deal of difference between a one-year-old and a three-year-old. Here we’ll just discuss onesies and twosies.  

The main job of a one-year-old as he progresses to being a two-year-old is to establish self-awareness, develop speech, become responsive to others, and begin to get the basics of self-control.

When a child is between the ages of one and two, parents can begin to take note of indications of developmental problems. Excessive adaptability problems become apparent; withdrawal, passivity, fearfulness; obsessive head banging, finger sucking, rocking; lack of interest; and being overly rebellious. If any of these extreme behaviors are noted by parents, they should be discussed with the pediatrician.

Physical development between one and two years includes: * Learning to walk * Learning to climb * Pushing and pulling objects * Stacking one object on top of another * Removing clothing

Intellectual development between one and two years includes: * Begins to explore the world around him * Used all five senses to learn about his world * Begins to learn and say names of simple objects * Can form simple one- or two-word sentences * Begins to enjoy and maybe imitate simple melodies and rhythms

Social development between one and two years includes: * Becoming possessive of his own possessions * Enjoying interaction with familiar people * Waves bye-bye and begins to accept separation

Emotional development between one and two years includes: * Begins to develop trust * Throws temper tantrums * Is usually happy but can become angry * May become frustrated

Morals begin to develop at about age two and are indicated by the child becoming sensitive to and seeking the approval of the adults in his world.

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years. TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more.  Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660.

Back to School Checklist

Families everywhere are getting ready for the beginning of the new school year.  Here are some helpful tips from Good Morning America parenting expert Ann Pleshette Murphy so you can be prepared for the first day.

1. Start readjusting to a school-year bedtime now.

2. Hang a family calendar and color-code everyone’s activities.

3. Gather all school forms as they arrive.

4. Book babysitters now for your school’s parents’ night and other dates when they’ll be in-demand.  Call TLC for Kids to help with all your babysitting needs.

5. Create a family station where you can find what you need as you head out the door.

6. Set up an in/out box for school forms.

7. Look at online organizational websites.

8. Discuss goals for the year.

9. Institute a night quiet hour.

10. Reach out to your child’s teacher.

 

Good luck on the first day.  Don’t forget to post your first day of school photo’s on our Facebook page for a chance to win $20 credit towards any TLC for Kids agency fee.

 

TLC For Kids, Inc. has been St. Louis’ premier nanny and babysitting agency for over 30 years.   TLC For Kids’ dedicated staff is ready to assist you in finding nannies, tutors, newborn care specialists, sitters and more.  Reach us at tlc@tlcforkids.com or 314-725-5660

 

Meet our Newest TLC for Kids Babysitters

We are happy to introduce three of our newest temporary sitters!

Krystal is currently attending the Hickey College school of Veterinary Technology and helps run an all male barbershop chorus. She has worked with children since she was 14 years old. Before working with TLC, Krystal babysat for friends and family since she was 14 and worked in a child development center. She has experience that ranges from one year olds to preteens! Krystal is available evenings and weekends.

Nadica is a very enthusiastic College student studying Mass Communications (TV and broadcasting). She has worked with children of all ages ranging from infancy to teenagers as a tutor, a gymnast coach and has held several nanny positions. She knows how to keep children active and motivated and is happy to prepare meals.

Caylee is a recent college graduate from SIUC. Caylee has a lot of personal experience working with children with disabilities – both during her internship with Special Olympics and summer nannying. She has also worked numerous sports camps for kids throughout her four years as a collegiate athlete.
Jasmine is available for day and evening shifts.

If you would like to arrange for any of these sitters for your next date night give us a call at 314-725-5660!

TLC for Kids Babysitter Reviews

Over the last few weeks we have collected some great feedback from our clients on the TLC sitters they have used.  Nothing makes us happier than to receive such glowing reviews of a job well done!  Way to go TLC caregivers!

Here are some of the comments clients have shared with us:

  • “Laura has been great. She has helped in every way. She has taken care of my newborn and has also now won over by very choosy toddler. My visit to Florida would have been very difficult without someone like Laura who is willing to help with everything and who is reliable. I would like to put her in my suitcase and take her back home with me 🙂 “
  • ” Erin was amazing! She far exceeded my expectations. I was a little worried about needing a sitter for 8 hours because that’s a long time and I was afraid the sitter might get worn out or frustrated after a while. Erin was so patient with the kids and kept them entertained the entire time. The biggest surprise for me was when I walked in the room and saw my 3 yr old was already in his pajamas and sleeping, and had been sleep since 9pm! Bedtime with him is a struggle, even for me! I feel triumphant if I can get him to bed before 11pm on weekends and even that requires a battle but Erin had no problem getting him to bed. My daughter is very picky about sitters and she loved Erin. She like her so much she even left the cutest note for me to find once I got back to the room. I thought it was very nice and a reflection of Erin’s great work so I attached it to the email for you to see.  My experience with TLC was amazing overall and I will definitely use the service again if the need arises!”
  • ” Julie was wonderful. I’m actually going to be specifically requesting her on my future TLC needs.”
  • ” Courtney was a fantastic nanny. I chatted with her for a while before we left, and I felt very comfortable leaving my son with her. She was warm and friendly and has a lot of newborn experience. My son has been having issues taking a bottle, and she even got him to successfully take down a couple ounces. I would highly recommend her and I hope to get her again. She also said wonderful things about TLC and the type of training she received through your service, making me even more confident booking a nanny through TLC again. “

If you are in need of a babysitter in St. Louis, Missouri or South Florida TLC is here for you.  Our babysitters are experienced, screened and reliable.  To learn more about requesting a TLC sitter visit our website at tlcforkids.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Car Seat Safety in Missouri

TLC for Kids babysitters and nannies are available to drive kids.   Our temporary babysitters can help with driving to school, after school activities or to a friend’s house for a play date.   TLC nannies not only drive kids to school and other activities but often assist the family with errands.  We do ask that the parents provide the sitter with the appropriate car seat.

 

 

 

 

Please read the information below about car seat recommendations and requirements for the state of Missouri.

 

 

 

 

Child Car Seat Laws
While safety belts offer excellent protection for adults, they are not designed to keep children safe in the event of a motor vehicle accident. Missouri law states:
• A child less than four years old or weighing under 40 pounds must be secured in a child passenger restraint system appropriate for the child.
• A child over four years of age, but less than eight years of age, who also weighs between 40 and 80 pounds and is under 4’9″ tall, must be secured in a child passenger restraint system or booster seat appropriate for that child.
• Children 8 years old and older at least 80 pounds, or children more than 4’9″ tall, are required to be secured by an appropriate vehicle safety belt or booster seat.
The fine for violating Missouri’s child safety law is $50 plus court costs. Child safety seat requirements do not apply to children who are being transported in a school bus or public carrier for hire.
If you’re in the market for one, you can shop online for a child car seat at any time. Before ordering, be sure to read our articles on How to Buy a Child Safety Seat and How to Install a Child Safety Seat.
If you have questions about Missouri’s child safety restraint laws or wish to schedule a checkup to ensure your car seat is installed correctly, contact the Missouri Department of Transportation at (800) 800-2358.
 Missouri Car Seat Laws
Any child under the age of four (4) must be restrained in a child safety seat.
This child passenger restraint system must have an approval label from the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) indicating that the child safety seat or system meets Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.
Missouri Booster Seat Requirements

Children meeting the following criteria must be transported in a booster seat:
The child weighs a minimum of forty (40) pounds regardless of age, or
The child is from four (4) to eight (8) years of age, or
The child weighs from forty (40) to eighty (80) pounds, or
The child is less than four (4) feet nine (9) inches in height

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